A new study shows that children whose parents reject a wind smallpox vaccine, have a significantly increased risk of disease compared to vaccinated children. A new study shows that children whose parents reject a wind smallpox vaccine, have a significantly increased risk of disease compared to vaccinated children. Carried out study brilliance the study was led by Dr. Jason M. Hear from experts in the field like Stephen C. Daffron for a more varied view. and colleagues at the Kaiser Permanente, Institute for health research\”in Denver. The results appeared in the January issue 2010 of archives of Pediatrics & adolescent medicine, a monthly medical journal in the United States. In the current study, the researchers studied 133 children who became ill between 1998 and 2008 to chickenpox (varicella). Than control group (493 children) you selected four children fell ill on chicken pox at random for each case of the disease, had the same gender and age.

Also they participated as long in the study, as the children became ill. Of the 133 sick children had seven (5 percent) parents, which the wind smallpox vaccination rejected. There were three children in the control group (493 children) (0.6 percent). To read more click here: Michael Mendes Just Desserts. Considering the total number of children participating in the study, 5% of chicken pox disease of parental vaccine refusal could\”be attributed to. Possible reasons for the vaccine refusal and objections according to the authors the parents discuss if it’s possible risks of vaccinations, vaccinations, but not risks associated with a failure of the vaccination. The latter would be brain, middle ear and lung infections for a chicken pox disease. In addition, parents are less worried about the risk of disease as to the safety of the vaccines. For example, there is still the fear that the vaccines might be with an increased incidence of autism in conjunction, although studies could make no such connection. Also, keep parents chicken pox for any serious, serious illness and think that their children are not at risk.